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    Listen Practice

  • oo 0.42
    Practice “oo”

    Form an “oo” with your lips. Sing with active support at the same volume as a song. This exercise is best done with The Zangger VoicePipe, but the higher keys may feel heavier so don’t go so high if the notes become less stable.

  • lip trill0.30
    Practice “Lip trill”

    A Lip Trill is formed by both lips vibrating. Push the lower jaw forward so that your top & bottom teeth are aligned. Some may have difficulty making the lips vibrate. If this is the case, put your fingers just above the lips on each side. Alternatively, use the Zangger VoicePipe instead.

  • ng 0.23
    Practice “ng”

    An “ng” is formed by the back of the tongue & soft palate as in the word “song”. The sound comes out through the nose. Relax your jaw & sing with a compact, clear sound.

    Listen Practice

  • ee 0.18
    Practice “ee”

    Now we are going to “tune” the voice, like we tune a guitar.

    Sing in the key that’s good for you. Slide under the piano note so that you can hear your voice “fighting” with the played note, and then slide up again to be in tune where the “beating” effect disappears. Don’t hold the notes too long otherwise your lack of breath may make your voice “shake”. This can disturb the tuning process. This exercise should be done in at least four different keys.

  • she-oh 0.19
    Practice “she-oh”

    This exercise blends falsetto & chest register in two parts. The onset for the second (chest register) section should be done lightly to avoid straining the voice. This exercise goes down in keys.– it starts in the higher

  • woh-oo-woh 0:25
    Practice “woh-oo-woh”

    This exercise has many details. Listen & Practicecarefully to the example so that you understand the little details in every syllable.

    Listen Practice

  • ee-eh 0:23
    Practice “ee-eh”

    This exercise helps you to hold stable pressure during long notes & phrases.

  • va-va 0:28
    Practice “va-va”

    This exercise will train the breathing musculature to find the right tension & air pressure for each note and to quickly release the pressure between every note. Let the pressure is build up on the “v” before opening for a short “va”. With this approach, the change in pressure causes the lungs to take in the right amount of air needed and you avoid drying out the vocal folds & over-pressurising the note. Check the muscles by placing your hands right below the diaphragm or on your waist.

  • you don’t know 0:31
    Practice “you don’t know”

    The object of this exercise is to control the strength of the note with the air pressure in the lungs with louder (‘crescendo’) and softer (‘diminuendo’) singing. Check the muscles by placing your hands right below the diaphragm or on your waist.

  • hold me 2:53
    Practice “hold me”

    In this exercise were are going to sing long phrases repeatedly without breathing to build vital capacity. Starting the phrases with aspirated consonants like ‘h’ & ‘ adds extra challenge.

    The exercise is supposed to be sung using the chest register. Don’t let too much air out with the consonants at the start of phrases and don’t strain your throat at the ends of the phrases. The stomach is supposed to be working at this point.

    Listen Practice

  • she-oo 0:16
    Practice “she-oo”

    We’re going to practice breathy falsetto. Make sure the tongue is low and flat inside the mouth and stay in the falsetto register in every key, singing with less strength as the keys of the exercise descend.

  • maybe baby 0:35
    Practice “maybe baby”

    Here we practice a more “compact” falsetto. Keep the back of the tongue high and sound a little “twangy”. This may sound “ugly” until you master the technique.

  • now now 0:33
    Practice “now now”

    This is sung in the chest register. Relax the jaw and sing straight onto the pitch. Don’t slide up to the note.

  • we would wait 0:46
    Practice “we would wait”

    Sing this in a thin chest register or compact falsetto in the higher keys. Sing the note with a creak onset don’t sing forcefully. To find the best balance between support & loudness, use The Zangger VoicePipe as this provides an almost perfect setup.

  • we you 0:40
    Practice “we you”

    Sing this in a thin chest register or compact falsetto in the higher keys. Don’t open your jaw too much. To find the best balance between support & loudness, use The Zangger VoicePipe as this provides an almost perfect setup.

  • yay-ya 0:33
    Practice “yay-ya”

    Sing this in chest register and only take a small amount of air in between the phrases. Do this silently through the mouth so that you maintain the larynx height.

  • oh-oh-oh-oh 0:26
    Practice “oh-oh-oh-oh”

    This exercise uses a heavier chest register. Remember to keep your support engaged.

  • oh 0:20
    Practice “oh”

    This exercise uses a heavier chest register. You might need to take in a larger amount of air between the phrases and keep your support engaged.

  • woh-ey-oh 0:36
    Practice “woh-ey-oh”

    Sing this in chest register. You need to open the jaw more the higher you sing, as if you are taking bigger & bigger bites of an apple or hamburger.

  • mimi yeah 0:27
    Practice “mimi yeah”

    The tone is supposed to start a little bit twangy and then go into a heavy chest register. Don’t breathe in too much air before the phrases, in fact, the feeling of holding your breath can help keep the first notes short & twangy. Keep your support engaged when singing the long note.

  • woy-yoy-yoy 0:22
    Practice “woy-yoy-yoy”

    Sing this in a heavy chest register. Maintain good support and despite the effort involved in this exercise, keep your shoulders & voice relaxed.

  • now-oo now now now 0:41
    Practice “now-oo now now now”

    This exercise emphasises the difference between falsetto & chest register. The challenge is to reach the right pitch straight after the transition, both up- and downwards. When going up, it helps to keep strong support during the chest register section letting the support go immediately in the transition to falsetto and vice versa.

  • nay 0:48
    Practice “nay”

    This exercise emphasises the difference between falsetto & chest register. The challenge is to reach the right pitch straight after the transition, both up- and downwards. When going up, it helps to keep strong support during the chest register section letting the support go immediately in the transition to falsetto and vice versa.

    Listen Practice

  • bey-pa-ma 0:14
    Practice “bey-pa-ma”

    Here we practice lip or “labial” consonants. The most challenging in this trio is ‘m’ so relax your jaw so you don’t get tired. The consonant ‘p’ can easily turn into a ‘b’ so make sure that you hear the little air puff at the start of the ‘p’.

  • na-la-ta-da 0:19
    Practice “na-la-ta-da”

    These consonants are formed by the tongue on the area right behind your upper front teeth (alveolar ridge). The most challenging in this group is usually ‘l’. Do them dynamically but avoid jaw tension.

  • ke-ge-ne 0:19
    Practice “ke-ge-ne”

    These consonants are formed by the tongue & soft palate. Keep the jaw relaxed.

  • vivi vava yeah 0:20
    Practice “vivi vava yeah”

    Relaxing the jaw even when it’s active. Decrease the strength of the note on the way up but without going into falsetto.

  • woh yeah woh 0:31
    Practice “woh yeah woh"

    It’s important to open the jaw on the highest notes and it should be active but relaxed.

  • va-va-va 0:23
    Practice “va-va-va”

    This can be intense for the jaw so focus on not straining it as it can lead to tired jaw muscles & voice.

    Listen Practice

  • hey-ya 2:51
    Practice “hey-ya”

    Listen & Practiceto the example to know which variations are to be done and in which order. Be accurate with the onsets & offsets. Make the onsets light, especially the glottal onsets that could otherwise strain the voice.

    Listen Practice

  • I don’t know what I told ya 0:42
    Practice “I don’t know what I told ya”

    “Ghost” notes are like small, separate glottal onsets that are percussive, rhythmic ingredients between the main notes. Don’t force the voice. Keep the ghost notes light.

  • I don’t know what I told ya (triplets) 0:31
    Practice “I don’t know what I told ya” (triplets)

    Here the “Ghost” notes are in triplets. Again, don’t force the voice. Keep the ghost notes light.

  • na-na-you 0:24
    Practice “na-na-you”

    Vibrato can be challenging for many and therefore good to practice separately. Sing this exercise without vibrato until the last note “yoo” where you relax the larynx so that it can start moving, creating a natural vibrato.

  • yeah 0:22
    Practice “yeah”

    This is an easy riffing exercise. Make the pitch changes distinct. You can also double the speed by singing the second part as sixteenths.

  • woh-yeah 0:38
    Practice “woh-yeah”

    End the notes quickly to make the change of pitch distinct.

  • yeah-yeah 0:21
    Practice “yeah-yeah”

    This is a long vocal riff exercise. Make sure each note is distinct in every key.

  • woh-yeah-woh 0:47
    Practice “woh-yeah-woh”

    This vocal riff is advanced requiring extremely quick changes in pitch throughout the exercise.

  • ni-ni 0:18
    Practice “ni-ni”

    “Twang” is a term used to describe a country voice, a wah-wah pedal on a guitar or an Texan accent. Twang is created when contracting the muscles in the epiglottis, throat or both. Imitate an evil witch’s laugh to understand what it sounds like. Don’t squeeze or press the vocal folds. This whining, cheeky sound is formed by the structures above the vocal folds so the voice shouldn’t feel strained.

  • eh-oh 0:32
    Practice “eh-oh”

    A typical example of belting is a news vendor loudly selling their newspapers. In voice science, belting is described as high, strong notes with a long closed phase sung in chest register. The timing of the in-breath is important. Use short inhalations through the mouth, strong support & maintain an open throat.

  • sayin-ney 0:35
    Practice “sayin-ney”

    We are going to distort on the top notes. Distortion & growl are best achieved with the structures above the vocal folds. Take in only a small amount of air. It can be helpful to have the feeling of holding your breath. If you use the vocal folds themselves for this exercise, you will get worn out quickly and there is a risk of vocal fold damage. Stop singing if you feel any discomfort.

    Listen Practice

  • oo 2:44
    Practice “oo”

    Form an “oo” with your lips. Sing with active support at the same volume as a song. This exercise is best done with The Zangger VoicePipe but can also be done using the lips.

  • m 0:33
    Practice “m”

    Sing using slides (glissando) on the nasal “m”. Sing using slides (glissando). Sing with a clear, non-breathy sound .

  • n 0:23
    Practice “n”

    Relax the jaw and don’t open the mouth more than feels natural. Sing with glissando between the notes. This exercise can also be done using The Zangger VoicePipe.